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There was a time

When I'd be walking to my car on Washington Street and see my friends having a drink.


They'd invite me to join them.


The same people I used to go to the gym with and have coffee with on Friday.


The same friends I'd watch outdoor movies with on Sunday and plan parties with.


We did everything together.


Volunteered. Exercised. Play board games. Had coffee. Drank wine. Danced. Laughed. Planned. Dreamed.


After a meeting, we'd get dinner together. After we volunteered, we'd continue to hang out. If it was someone's birthday, we treated them to dinner. If someone was sad, we'd cheer them up. If someone's parents were in town, we'd entertain them.


When I first got home, I was welcomed by a new group of amazing friends. They loved me, protected me, and took care of me. It helped me transition and heal. We no longer spend time together, but I hold onto those moments. I thank God for the memories and how easy it was.

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